Naruto Hoodies Guide

Naruto Hoodie

Guide to not buying a dud

Naruto is the 4th best selling Manga series of all time. In the two and half decades since its creation, it has exploded over the globe to one of the most popular Japanese comic characters around. 

So it’s no surprise that lots of people are after Naruto merch, and the Naruto hoodie is a popular choice – especially as a present for your anime loving family member or friend.

So here is a guide on how to buy a Naruto Hoodie gift that won’t disappoint.

Where To Buy Naruto Hoodies

There are a range of places to get yourself or a loved one wrapped in some Naruto. Some good places to look are:

Amazon Naruto Hoodies List

This is the big one! This is the highest customer ranking Naruto hoodie:

Amazon Japan Naruto Hoodies List

If you are looking for something a bit different from Naruto’s home land, try Amazon Japan, some of who’s sellers ship internationally, or you can use a shipping service to get them shipped to your country via Japan.

Etsy Naruto Hoodies List

Etsy has really interesting selections that you won’t find anywhere else. Their top rated Naruto hoodie is this retro design:

 

Aliexpress Naruto Hoodies List

Often the cheapest option, although you won’t find so many official items!

Check Product On Aliexpress

Teepublic Naruto Hoodies List

Great for unusual and fan generated designs. Teepublic lets independent designers make their own creations, so there are some great finds on there!

Naruto Hoodie Designs

Let’s face it, this is going to be the big one for most people.

You are mostly going to find designs based around certain characters and places. The main ones are:

Naruto Hoodie Characters

Naruto Uzumaki

Of course, Naruto himself is the main man. So the bulk of Naruto hoodie paraphernalia features our hero.

Probably the most “classic” design is the orange sided one that the main character Naruto himself wears in most of the anime series. If you after something that is instantly recognisable to those who are already familiar with Naruto, but not necessarily to those who aren’t, this is probably the one to go for.

The top customer rated on Amazon in this style is this one:

 

Sasuke Uchiha

The main arch-nemesis of the piece is Sasuke, but he has his own dark charm that makes him one of the most popular characters from the Naruto universe. He’s a bit like the biblical disciple Peter who betrayed Jesus, but who is deep down (hopefully) a good person.

Suitably “bad boy” is the Sasuke themed denim hoodie below.

Kakashi Hatake

Kakashi is consistently voted as one of the most popular characters in Naruto. He is a leadership figure, is mysterious, and just down-right cool looking. So he is a popular motif in Naruto paraphernalia.

This is the top customer rated Kakashi item on Amazon, and even comes with a head band!

Akatsuki

The Akatsuki are a bunch of bad-boy criminals with distinctive red ensignia. Their black background and striking logo, matched with their tough-gang mystique, make them popular in the Naruto merch world, including Naruto Hoodies.

Here is a classic example:

 

Official Versus Unofficial Naruto Hoodies

Officially licensed Naruto hoodie products will usually say so fairly prominently in the description. There is no guarantee that officially licensed products are actually going to be better than the unofficial products, but it does offer some suggestion that the product isn’t going to be complete rubbish. 

If you stick to only official products, it will limit your options a lot and you will probably have to pay more. In a lot of cases, you can do a little homework on product reviews and find something that you can have confidence in outside the confines of “official”.

Naruto Hoodie Materials

Naruto hoodies come in a range of materials. The word “hoodie” conjures up images of something fleecy and warm, but not all items called a hoodie will conform to these ideas.  A lot of people get excited about a hoodie design, order online, and then get disappointed when the item arrives and it doesn’t feel like how they had imagined. Before you click that “order” button take a moment to check what you are actually getting.

Usually Naruto hoodies will be some combination of:

Polyester

Cotton

Spandex

If you want something that is going to last longer, try looking for something that has some proportion of natural fibre like cotton. 

A spandex garment is obviously going to be more stretchy and fitted rather than warm and fleecy, so be aware of this when ordering.

Naruto Hoodie Sizes

A lot of people have trouble with items being larger or smaller than they think because of differences in sizes between different countries, most notably between the United States and other Asian Countries.

Here is a list of the top customer rated Naruto Hoodies across several stores.

We hope that has simplified the process of finding a Naruto Hoodie. If you’re not sure, then it’s probably good to go for the trad-orange Naruto hoodie. Have fun!

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Male Kimono

Male Kimono

男性着物

That's how you rock a Men's Kimono

If you’re a fan of Japanese culture like me, you probably take an interest in Japanese clothing as well. So I thought it would be fun to take a look at different men’s kimonos, men’s yukata and men’s silk robes that are out there. 

Once you start looking into the world of Japanese traditional clothing, it’s deep and diverse world. So I’ll try and simplify things a bit so that we can get the lay of land. 

The main message is that kimonos are not just a relic of the past, but can actually be one of the more versatile, comfortable types of clothing out there. Warm in the winter and cooling in the summer, quality kimonos are easy to layer and made from breathable fabrics. With proper care, high-quality kimono garments can last you for years.

Let’s start by taking a look at a few of the most interesting kimono for men, and kimono inspired garments for men, available today. Then, we’ll dive a little deeper into the world of men’s kimono.

Also check out the Japanoscope Jinbei page if you are interested in finding out more about the summery jacket-and-shorts type kimono.

If you are interested in making your own, have a look at the Japanoscope fabrics page.

Mens Japanese Linen Loose Jacket Casual

Kimono inspired without screaming in your face “I’m wearing a Kimono”.

Pros

  • Breathable linen material
  • Button up or leave open
  • Short sleeves leaves hands free

Cons

  • Not as ditinctly Japanese looking as some other items

Casual Loose Horn Button Linen V-Neck Coat

Casual, understated Kimono haori-style jacket

Pros

  • Genuine linen
  • Range of sizes
  • Can be combined with Japanese or non-Japanese clothing

Cons

  • Can’t be tied or buttoned at front

ArmorStyle Silk Japanese Kimono (With Mask!)

Made from a high-quality blend of polyester and cotton, this silky Japanese Kimono creates an effortless flowy motion on the slightest movement. The robe is extremely soft to the touch, making it perfect for lounging on the home or taking a reflective walk on the beach.

The kimono features a three-quarter length sleeve and straight-edge trail. A simple tie-on belt helps to secure the waist. The black kimono features illustrated blossoms and parakeets for a naturalistic look.

Pros

  • Offers simple, elegant design
  • Lightweight materials allow for natural movement of the fabric
  • Perfect for Spring and Summer

Cons

  • Some would prefer a more traditional style
  • Does not come with matching face mask like the title implies

Folding Leg Japanese Table Set

Looking for something with a modern twist? The budget-friendly LifeHe Kimono tapers right at the waist like a cardigan, yet boasts the look and fit of a traditional kimono. The double-layer polyester fabric is sufficiently lightweight for a smooth, silk-like feeling on the skin.

The kimono is available in two patterns: black floral fabric with red cherry blossoms or an all-white fabric with pink cherry blossoms. On both, an illustrated koi fish decorates the back for a striking look.

Pros

  • Cardigan fit is great for informal settings
  • Great for casual outdoor wear
  • Polyester fabric is soft yet inexpensive

Cons

  • Should only be washed through hand-washing
  • Colors may fade over time with frequent sun exposure

Haorun Men's Japanese Kimono

Made from a delicate cotton blend, the Haorun yukata is perfect for warmer seasons. The kimono features a slimmer profile, yet flows very well upon movement.

The slightest wind picks up the back of the kimono, revealing the pattern of birds in flight. This black yukata is designed for informal wear indoors, use as a bathrobe, or for hot summer days.

Pros

  • Mid-calf length is perfect for outdoor trips
  • Unique pattern emphasizes the movement of the back of the robe
  • Cotton-polyester blend offers thinnest, most lightweight feel

Cons

  • Sizes run on the small side – buyers beware!
  • Not fit for winter wear

The Ins and Outs of the Male Kimono

Materials Used in Men’s Kimonos

Kimonos and the obi belts used to tie them are made from many distinct types of fabric. Linen, silk, hemp, crepe, wool, and cotton are all popular varieties.

When purchasing a kimono, the materials used are the best insight you have into the quality.

On the less expensive end, 100 percent polyester is used to mimic the movement and feeling of silk. Often, a cotton-polyester blend is employed to give the kimono more weight.

Hemp and linen kimonos are the easiest to take care of. Featuring a cooling texture, these kimonos are great for the warmer season and can usually be machine washed. Keep in mind that these materials are not suitable for formal events.

Though it’s decreased in popularity, wool kimonos can still be found. Wool kimonos are great for winter and retain their shape very well.

Still, when it comes to a kimono, pure silk is second to none in terms of quality and comfort. Curiously, silk is cooling in the summer and keeps you warm in the winter – that’s why it’s often referred to as a “second skin”. High-quality silk kimonos can be a lifelong (or even intergenerational) investment.

Types of Men’s Kimonos

There’s a bunch of different types of kimonos for men to choose from. Probably the most well known is the casual light summer attire yukata. This is probably because you see this type of Kimono around so much at festivals or at onsen bath towns in Japan.

Others include: 

Iromuji 

Patternless Kimono that can have house insignias printed on them to be used at formal occasions. They can be worn as everyday wear. They are also der rigour at tea ceremonies because they are considered understated enough to not clash with any decorations or utensil patterns involved in the ceremony.

Samue

Pants and jackets sets that are often used as work wear for artisans etc.

Jinbei

Light jacket and short sets that are breezy garments for hot days or for after the bath. Check out the Japanoscope Jinbei guide here.

Happi

Jackets that are often used for festive occasions and may have writing on the front lapels advertising a team, house, company etc.

Hanten

Hanten jackets are popular house ware, especially in their warm winter coat variety. I personally live in my hanten jacket throuout the colder months. They are very popular for children also. See the Japanoscope Hanten page here.

Tsumugi

A woven silk garment. These have the high quality and durability of silk but are not as silky or flashy. They are popular due to their more subtle, refined nature. They are often so well made and long lasting that they are passed down from father to son to be worn by a whole new generation. 

Montsuki

“Montsuki” literally means “crested” and denotes a kimono with some kind of family or house crest. These are considered the most formal Kimono and are usually worn with a full length under robe “Nagagi” and a pair of pants called “Hakama”. This sort of attire is commonly worn for weddings or formal ceremonies.

Male kimonos can also be divided by material. Silk kimonos are generally reserved for special occasions, while thicker clothes (like cotton) are suitable for lounging.

 

A diagram of Japanese men's Kimono from informal to formal (left to right)

What Are The Differences Between Men’s and Women’s Kimonos?

Men’s and women’s kimonos differ significantly. Typically, women’s kimonos feature more vibrant colors, patterns, and fold varieties, while the traditional male kimono is usually subtle in color. Brown, black, gray, and navy blue are all common variations.

Additionally, the belt used to hold the kimono together, also known as the obi, is distinct for men. While kimonos geared for women feature thicker obi, male kimonos’ obi are thinner and less decorative.

Traditionally, male kimonos designed for less formal occasions were brighter in color and may have featured simple patterns. Today, there’s no shortage of male kimonos with ostentatious, complex, and vibrant colors.

You might notice that women have much more to choose from when selecting a new kimono. The reason is simple: More women demand kimonos than men, especially for formal events like graduations and weddings. This divide came about some time in the Meiji restoration when Japan went through a rapid transition to westernisation. Men were very much expected to “move with the times” while women were expected to be more “traditionally decorative”.

What is a male kimono called?

There are many names for different types of male kimono including yukata, montsuki, samue, jinbei, happi, hakama etc. “Kimono” literally just means “clothing” so if you think of the range of different types of clothing that exist in contemporary western culture, you will find that just as many different types and categories exist within Kimono.

What do men in Japan wear?

Contemporary Japanese men wear very similar clothing to contemporary Western men. They also have the option of wearing a range of different Kimono such as yukata, montsuki, samue, jinbei, happi, hakama etc. either in combination with Western clothing or independently.

Do males wear kimonos? Can a man wear a kimono?

Yes, throughout most of Japanese history Kimono is all Japanese men wore. Japanese men still wear kimono in a range of contexts, mostly anywhere that involves traditional Japanese culture, such as ceremonies, at temples, around bath houses, taking part in traditional crafts and performances.

Can you wear kimono with western clothes?

Yes, go for it Many Japanese and non-Japanese people have experimented with combining Western and Japanese clothing, coming up with all sorts of interesting combinations. 

Black Dragon Men's Kimono Haori

The JEArtGallery kimono certainly makes a great first impression. Featuring a white dragon on the back and delicate koi fish on the front, the black kimono is a statement piece.

 

The delicate robe is made from lightweight, flowy materials that emphasize movement. It’s finished with an open-front fit and three-quarter length sleeves. Moreover, it can easily be layered over clothing for colder seasons or worn as-is for warm weather.

 

Pros

  • Comes with a thick polyester-blend belt for closure
  • Three-quarter sleeves offer a broad, oversized opening for the forearms
  • Larger fit kimono can easily be layered over thick-knit winter clothing
  • Comes in several different unique patterns featuring white dragons

Cons

  • Some might prefer more traditional Japanese kimono designs
  • Only offered in cardigan length fit

Black Dragon Men's Kimono Haori

Sourced from pure linen with a natural silk belt, you’d be hard-pressed to find something more comfortable than the ChinatamaniAlchemi kimono. This Bohemian-style kimono is shaped akin to a classic yukata, yet is set apart by its asymmetric tunic fit.

 

The kimono features a wide belt and is offered in shades like dusky pink, classic black, and silver-gray. The pure linen material is ideal for days spent on the beach or out around town.

Pros

  • Offered in several different shades
  • Made from breathable linen and silk
  • Asymmetric fit offers many different styling options from cafen to yukata, kimono, or tunic

Cons

  • Some may prefer more traditional Japanese kimono look, fit, and feel
  • Linen material retains wrinkles, unlike classic silk kimonos

Black Dragon Men's Kimono Haori

Sourced from pure linen with a natural silk belt, you’d be hard-pressed to find something more comfortable than the ChinatamaniAlchemi kimono. This Bohemian-style kimono is shaped akin to a classic yukata, yet is set apart by its asymmetric tunic fit.

 

The kimono features a wide belt and is offered in shades like dusky pink, classic black, and silver-gray. The pure linen material is ideal for days spent on the beach or out around town.

Pros

  • Offered in several different shades
  • Made from breathable linen and silk
  • Asymmetric fit offers many different styling options from cafen to yukata, kimono, or tunic

Cons

  • Some may prefer more traditional Japanese kimono look, fit, and feel
  • Linen material retains wrinkles, unlike classic silk kimonos

Final Thoughts

Hopefully you’ve got something out of this little exploration of the world of the male kimono.  If you’re in the market for to buy some men’s kimono garments, it really does depend on what you’re looking for. But personally I like the men’s linen options from Newchic. Made from 100 percent cotton, the kimono is cheaper than its silk counterparts yet doesn’t skimp on quality. The full-length kimono is handcrafted by artisans from Kyoto. The simple pattern is good for use in casual settings or combining with other clothing items. Here’s to the continued varying history of the mighty! Also check out the Japanoscope Jinbei page if you are interested in finding out more about the summery jacket-and-shorts type kimono. If you are interested in making your own, have a look at the Japanoscope fabrics page.  

Japanoscope is a registered affiliate with several online shops and may receive a commission when you click on some of the links within content.

How To Choose The Best Hanten Jacket or Chanchanko

Hanten Jackets

半纏

I’ve got a confession to make. In winter, I almost never remove my hanten. Maybe I feel the cold more than most, but I tend to have slippers on my feet and a blanket over my legs much of the time. But what to put on the top? Well, the cotton stuffed hanten Japanese jacket is the answer!

 

I’ll go into the details of how you can chose a good hanten below but if you just want to see my favorite hanten that are available online here they are.

#1 Men's Hanten - Striped Watanosato Traditional Hanten

If you’re looking for a classic men’s traditional hanten, this Watanosato our is hard to beat.

Pros

  • Plenty of padding/insulation = super warm
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Two pockets
  • large size
  • non-slippery inside

Cons

  • Design maybe too understated for some

#1 Women's Hanten Watanosato Traditional Hanten

This is a classic traditional hanten from Watanosato, with striking rich colors.

Pros

  • Plenty of padding/insulation = super warm
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Two pockets
  • non-slippery inside
  • Made In Japan

Cons

  • May be too traditional for some

#1 Kid's Cute Sugarajino Hanten

This is a classic traditional hanten from Watanosato, with striking rich colors.

Pros

  • Plenty of padding/insulation = super warm
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Two pockets
  • non-slippery inside
  • Made In Japan

Cons

  • May be too traditional for some

What is a Hanten Jacket?

What’s so good about the Hanten?

A Hanten is a type of Japanese jacket or vest. Hanten are most commonly associated with thick winter Japanese jackets that are stuffed with cotton and most commonly worn as warm house-wear. They are strongly associated with being clothing of the everyday folk, in contrast to the Haori style jacket, which was traditionally worn by people of higher status in Japan.

The term “Hanten” can be used as a general term for Japanese jackets, including the sub-type of “Happi”. Sleeveless hanten are also called “Chanchanko”.

 
Hanten Japanese Jacket Chanchanko

Well, as my partner once said to me, wearing a hanten is kind of like wearing a futon (in the Japanese sense of the word, meaning bedding). In the colder months, I literally wear my hanten jacket from morning to night, every day of the week. If it’s a cold night, I even wear it to bed – which is not uncommon in Japan. The Hanten is one versatile piece of clothing. It’s most closely associated with around-the-house wear in Japan, but you can also wear them out, or as pajamas. That’s a lot of bang for your buck.

Types of Japanese Jackets - Hanten, Happi, Haori?

There is a lot of overlap between what gets called a hanten, a happi and a haori. This is true to some extent even in Japan, but you’ll find that in particular outside of Japan people tend to get, ahem, a little loosey goosey with the nomenclature (as is true with many Japanese objects).
Until the Edo period, a Happi was a Haori that was worn with a turned up collar and a Hanten was a garment that was worn to protect from the cold. In the Edo period, strict rules around which classes of people could wear types of clothing came into effect. Only people of high social standing could wear Haori, characterised by the folded up collar, while lower classes wore the non folded-collar hanten or happi. Hanten and haori also have differently shaped sleeves.
A haori is more commonly worn over the top of kimono, while hanten and happi are more commonly worn directly over underclothes or a shirt.
Adding to the confusion is the fact that a Happi can also be referred to as a Shirushi Banten (Banten being a slight variation on the word hanten, and shirushi meaning “symbol”). Confusing right? These Japanese jackets commonly have business symbols or insignias on them and can be seen at festivals and or festive business or shopping events.

What Types of Hanten Japanese Jackets are there?

There are three main lengths of winter-style hanten; long sleeve, mid length sleeve (Yakko) and sleeveless (Chanchanko).

Long Sleeve 長袖

Long sleeves are obviously the warmest option. If you are looking for something that is the closest to feeling like you are wrapped up in a blanket (without having to drag around a blanket with you), then this is the one. 

The drawback is that cotton filled hanten Japanese jackets are very bulky. I find that I am constantly accidentally knocking things over when I wear them, and this is going to be most pronounced in a long sleeve Hanten. So if you think you are going to be wearing your hanten for anything work or task related, like cooking in the kitchen, or doing arts and craft, then this is probably not the best option. If you just want something to keep you warm when you’re lounging around watching the TV, this is the one.

 

Mid-Length Sleeve 半袖

The mid-length sleeve hanten has its own name, the “yakko”. This is the hanten / chanchanko I recommend for most people. You get most of the warmth of the long sleeve, and most of the utility of a sleeveless type in these mid-point hanten. That being said, I find even wearing the mid-length sleeve, I still inadvertently knock things off benches and surfaces from time to time due to the sheer bulk of the stuffed fabric hanten. But, generally speaking I still find it fine for cooking or doing most simple work-related tasks.

 

Short Sleeve 袖なし型(ちゃんちゃんこ)

The short sleeve hanten is popular for children, because they leave the hands free to get dirty. They are great for anyone that is looking for some extra body warmth while they are carrying out tasks with their hands, including cooking.

These Japanese vest chanchanko were very popular with Japanese people from the previous generation, so they are also considered quite nostalgic and associated with older people.

Now you’ve got all the info you need to embark on your quest for the perfect Jimbei. We’ve searched across the internet to find a selection across a range of outlets:

Where to buy a hanten?

There are several places that sell hanten Japanese jackets and Japanese vests online. Below are links to the hanten pages on the top major retailers.
Amazon
Etsy

Japan Store
Ali Express

We’ve got more general info about hanten construction below.

Recommended Men's Hanten

#2 Men's Hickory Hanten

This Hanten screams style and sophistication.

Pros

  • Fine Quality Padded Cotton
  • Beautiful 100% outer cotton fabric
  • Standard Padding: 70% cotton, 30% polyester

Cons

  • Non traditional colors

#3 Men's Super Colorful Watanosato Hanten

This hanten makes a STATEMENT!

Pros

  • Well made.
  • Reputable brand – Watanosato
  • Standard Padding material mix: 70% Desi Cotton, 30% polyester
  • Comfortable inner materials

Cons

  • Two over the top for some!

#4 Patchwork Sugurajino Hanten

This design harks back to the “working class” nature of the hanten in beautiful way

Pros

  • Unique patchwork design
  • Quality fabric
  • 90% cotton, 10% polyester
  • Pocket

Cons

  • Only one outside Pocket

#5 Men's Insignia Hanten

This one has a large Chinese Character on the back in the style of a “Montsuki ” 紋付きor “Shirushi Banten” 印半纏.

Pros

  • Distinctive insignia design
  • Classic understated blue
  • Cotton Blend Materials

Cons

  • Not Japanese made

Recommended Women's Hanten

#2 Women's Multi-Pattern Watanosato Hanten

This “patchwork kimono” style hanten is cute and feminine without being over the top.

Pros

  • Tasteful patchwork patern
  • All cotton outside
  • Well padded and warm
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Pocket
  • Made in Japan

Cons

  • Relatively short sleeves not as warm as longer sleeves (but better for doing work related tasks)

#3 Women's Reversible Watanosato Hanten

Why have just one lush pattern to wear when you could have two?

Pros

  • Tasteful patchwork patern
  • All cotton outside
  • Well padded and warm
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Pocket
  • Made in Japan

Cons

  • Relatively short sleeves not as warm as longer sleeves (but better for doing work related tasks)

#3 Floral Long Sleeve Hanten

If you are looking for something that is feminine and provides maximum warmth with a full arm length, this is a great choice.

Pros

  • Stunning, traditional floral design
  • Long arm length is very warm
  • Soft yet durable materials
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Two pockets
  • non-slippery inside
  • Made In Japan

Cons

  • Long arm length can make it hardto do work based tasks.

#4 Tropical Hanten

A sunny, tropical twist on the hanten with innovative design features such as inner pockets for placing heat packs.

Pros

  • Unique tropical design
  • Two inner pockets for putting “kairo” heat packs
  • Polyester and Cotton materials.

Cons

  • Not Japanese made

#5 Sleeveless Hanten Japanese Vest

If you want a hanten that keeps the body warm while leaving your arms free to move, unenumbered by the bulky cotton padding, this sleeveless hanten is a good option.

Pros

  • Arms free to do work tasks such as cooking
  • Plenty of padding/insulation = super warm
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Two pockets
  • Made In Japan

Cons

  • No sleeve model not as warm as long sleeve

Recommended Kid's Hanten

#2 Kid's Spotted Hanten

Traditional Japanese spotted design for boys or girls

Pros

  • Tasteful patchwork patern
  • All cotton outside
  • Well padded and warm
  • Quality workmanship
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Pocket
  • Made in Japan

Cons

  • Relatively short sleeves not as warm as longer sleeves (but better for doing work related tasks)

#3 Kid's Soft Short Sleeve Hanten

100% cotton outside kids hanten with short sleeves to keep your toddler or young child warm

Pros

  • 100% cotton
  • Soft materials for sensitive kid’s skin
  • Standard 70% cotton, 30% polyester padding inside
  • Two pockets
  • Short sleeves keep children’s hands free

Cons

  • Only one color option

#4 Kid's & Baby's Tassled Hanten

One of a kind hand-crafted hanten

Pros

  • One of a kind hand crafted item
  • Distinctive tassel string
  • Deep muted tones
  • All cotton outside

Cons

  • Polyester inside

What are Hanten made of?

Most hanten are either made of cotton or a synthetic material such as polyester. 

Cotton

Cotton is great for warmth and softness of touch. You will pay more for items made completely from natural materials though.

Synthetic Materials

Synthetic materials tend to allow more striking printed patterns. And polyester is cheaper. For the majority of hanten, you find that they will be a combination of cotton and polyester, with 70% cotton, 30% polyester being something of an industry standard. 

Silk

Some very high end items are made of silk, but these are fairly uncommon. Silk is a material associated with wealth and opulence, and the hanten is considered a garment of the people, which probably explains while silk hanten are harder to find.

What does hanten mean in japanese?

The “han”半 from the word “hanten” means half, and refers to the length of the sleeves being half length. The “ten” 纏 simply refers to something that is worn. 

Reading The Tag

The tag above reads:

表地 Front Material 綿 Cotton 100%

裏地 Rear material 綿 Cotton 100%

中わた Inner Padding 綿 Cotton 70%

ポリエステル Polyester 30%

Who wears hanten in japan?

Hanten are worn widely by women, men and children. The hanten is considered a garment of the working classes, because of its history of being worn by people that were not considered high class enough to wear a haori.

In their unstuffed-with-cotton form, you’ll see them at festivals and with business names or other promotional writing written vertically down the inner hems.

In their stuffed-with-cotton form, they are basically worn by anyone who doesn’t like being a cold and doesn’t want to drag a doona around with them everywhere they go.

Children's kids hanten Japanese jacket
Kid's Hanten

How to wear a hanten

A hanten can be worn over the top over most garments. They are large items that tie simply at the front with a short string, so they are flexible. In recent times, younger people in particular have been wearing hanten in combination with just about any kind of western clothing you can think of, so you don’t need to get caught up too much in looking for the “correct” way to coordinate. You can get a few ideas here.

You can even find hanten that are somewhere between a jacket and a traditional garment.

How to care for a hanten

Caring for a hanten is somewhat similar to caring for a futon – they need to be aired and dried out from time to time. Every one to two weeks it is best to find a sunny morning and hang them out in the light for an hour or two. 

How to clean hanten

Generally speaking, hanten don’t take well to being washed in a machine. Depending on the garment, it may be possible to put your hanten in a net and machine wash. But you run the risk of having the padding inside the garment come out through the seams if the cycle is too rough. For most cases, it is better to wash by hand, smooth out any creases and let it dry out in the sun.

If you’re looking for something to wear in the summer months, check out our guide to Jinbei here.

Look for more Hanten options on Amazon

Look for more Hanten options on Etsy

Japanoscope is a registered affiliate with several online shops and may receive a commission when you click on some of the links within content.

Contributor

Hi, I’m Peter.  I lived in Japan for four years as a University student completing a Masters Degree in Musicology.  I have succesfully completed the  highest level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (N1).  have toured the country six times playing music and singing songs in Japanese and English.

Best Kimono Fabric

So you you’ve decided to get creative with Kimono fabric. You’ve fallen in love with the lush patterning and imagery and colors. Well, theres plenty to consider when buying fabric. Aside from an attractive pattern, you should look carefully at the fabric’s weight, texture, and fabric content. There are so many different fabric options to choose from. This article will help you get started.

We get into the nitty gritty I’ve getting yourself some swish Kimono material swag below but if you just want to see the top three of our top 10 (actually 11, because we like a lot of Kimonos) then here they are:

#1 Silk Teal Floral Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Silk, the emperoro of Kimono fabrics!
  • Vintage Japanese fabric
  • Elegant drape
  • Longer dimensions in length

Cons

  • Vintage item means possible imperfections from previous use

#2 Classic Colorful Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Popping, vibrant colors
  • Classic, trad patterning
  • Printed cotton stretch satin fabric
  • Flexible: 97% cotton + 3% spandex
  • Sold by the meter

Cons

  • Bright colors are generally associated with Kimonos for young people in Japan, so may not be appropriate for all ages.
  • Possibly to overtly “Japanese” for some tastes.

#3 Vibrant Colored Wool Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Pros

    • Quality Wool Rustic weave
    • Beautiful range of patterns
    • Excellent condition
    • Made from wool and rayon

Cons

  • Not appropiate for making kimono for formal settings or occasions

How to choose the best fabric

Making your own kimono fabric garments is a rewarding project, and if done right, can result in a beautiful garment that you can wear for years and occassions to come. To help you make the best garment for your needs, we will look the different types of kimono fabrics, what differentiates the fabrics, the advantanges and disadvantages of the different fabrics, and finally, the appropiate settings for wearing certain kimonos.

Types of Kimono Fabric

We are going to look at four different types of fabrics for kimonos: silk, hemp, wool, and synthetic fiber.

Silk

The words “silk” and “kimono” are synonymous, as many traditional Japanese kimonos are made of silk, called 生絹 suzushi or 絹 kinu in Japanese. There are several different types of silk that are used across the world:

  • Mulberry silk
  • Eri silk
  • Tussar silk
  • Muga silk

About 90% of silk in the world comes from Mulberry silk, and mulberry silk is the most common silk used in Japan, primarily because it is the softest.

Hemp

A kimono made from hemp work very well in the summertime. Hemp is traditionally used for the men’s yukata, which is a casual robe, traditionally associated with bathing, with a simple sash.

 

 

Wool

Because wool is very warm material, it is great for the winter. In fact, between 1926-1989 during the Showa period, wool kimonos were very popular in the daily attire of Japanese men, women and children.

 

 

 

 

 

Synthetic Fiber

Synthetic fiber has drastically improved in quality, texture, and appearance, and is therefore a popular choice for making kimonos. That being said, there are inherent disadvantages of using synthetic fiber, which we will discuss more thoroughly below.

Advantages of one type of fabric over the other

Silk is perhaps the best material you could find for making a classic kimono. A natural product coming from our old friend the silk worm, it is surprisingly strong. Silk is known to be incredibly insulating: it keeps you cool during the summer and warm during the winter. Because it is made from fiber that has the same protein as human skin, it helps your body retain moisture and keeps your skin looking fresh. Silk is also known to last a very long time, if it is properly cared for. Kimono made from silk are worn to both formal and informal events. That being said, silk is also the most expensive material you can find.

Hemp is light, cool, fast drying, and does not stick on the skin. For these reasons, it is a wonderful fabric choice for making a summer kimono or garments made of kimono fabric. A kimono made with hemp typically does not involve any sort of lining. The fabric is especially strong and durable, which makes it easier to clean without causing any damage. Hemp kimono fabric is generally associated with casual settings.

Wool has a rougher texture, but is very warm and stylish. Woolen kimono fabric is generally not worn in formal settings, but is more at home out on the streets with a scarf and hat. The woollen kimono fabric can be washed (but not dried!) at home without risk of damage.

Synthetic fiber is strong and safe to wash in the washing machine. If this is your first time working with kimono fabric, it might be a good idea to start with synthetic fiber, as the material might be easier to handle, and it is most definitely less expensive. Synthetic fiber can, however, irritate sensitive skin. Because it is not a very breathable material, it might get uncomfortable and sweaty, especially in hotter weather.

Best way to use different types of fabrics for kimonos

Silk fabrics are probably the best for most projects as it can be used in many different settings. Wool and hemp are best for casual occasions and seasonal settings. Synthetic kimono fabrics are generally considered least desirable, though they are cheaper and can be used in everyday garments, and in formal ones at a pinch.

#4 Cherry Blossoms & Cranes Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Pros

    • Features two of the most potent symbols of Japan – Cranes and Cherry Blossoms
    • Vibrant but subtle colors
    • Petal Signature Cotton
    • 100% natural cotton with a versatile, plain weave. Perfect for quilting, craft projects, toys and accessories
    • Design By: Juditgueth
    • Adjust quantity to purchase multiple yards, will be printed as a continuous length
    • Sustainably Made-to-Order by Spoonflower in Durham, North Carolina

Cons

  • Cotton not as luxurious as silk

#5 Kawaii Sushi Wool Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Super unique, super kawaii material
  • Non-traditional
  • Petal Signature Cotton Fabric
  • Petal Signature Cotton — 42 inches wide // 4.3 oz per square yard
  • 100% natural cotton with a versatile, plain weave. Perfect for quilting, craft projects, toys and accessories.
  • Design By: Gaiamarfurt
  • Adjust quantity to purchase multiple yards, will be printed as a continuous length
  • Sustainably Made-to-Order by Spoonflower in Durham, North Carolina

Cons

  • Not suited to people looking for classic traditional kimono fabric

#6 Wave Pattern Wool Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Traditional Seigaha wave design and color
  • Three designs in one lot – ideal for multi piece garments
  • Light cotton for summer months

Cons

  • Set sizes and patterns not customizable

#7 Festive Brocade Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Ornate festive color and pattern
  • Brocade
  • Shrink resistant
  • Stitch-Bonded

Cons

  • Non-silk Rayon / Polyester product

#8 Green Satin Brocade Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Rare vintage material
  • appropiate for more formal atire
  • Luxurious Satin Brocade

Cons

  • possibility for stains or discolorations
  • Vintage item has some uncertainty about whether material is Rayon or not

#9 Crane Patterned Wool Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Striking colors and pattern
  • Traditional design
  • Cranes are considered an auspicious animal in Japan bringing long life
  • Four colours to choose from

Cons

  • Cotton Chintz material is less traditional than others

#10 Patterned Beige Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • This material is sold by the yard and is 35 centimeters wide. The material is dotted with blue and beige half circles atop a lighter beige background, and would make a beautiful garment for a warm summer day.
    Pros

    • beautiful earthy design
    • Breathing hemp material
    • excellent vintage condition
    • unused

Cons

  • mix of polyester and hemp fibers
  • not appropiate for formal settings and occassions

#11 Kawaii Cats and Eggs Kimono Fabric

Pros

  • Super cute cats & eggs (of course!)
  • Perfect for kid’s kimonos and garments
  • non-traditional
  • pattern also incorporates traditional elements

Cons

  • Not Made-In-Japan item

In our selection, we feel the the trad-silk option at #1 is hard to go past. It’s just hard to compete with mother nature and hundreds of years of tradition. But really a lot of the choice will come down to personal aesthetics. It can be surprisingly hard to find good quality Japanese materials and kimono fabrics online, so hopefully we’ve made the job a little easier.

If you are a fan of kimono, you may be interested in checking out the Japanoscope guide to Jinbei clothing or Japanese pajamas.

Japanoscope uses affiliate links. Which means we may receive commisions when you click on some product links. We only link to products we believe in, use ourselves or think are genuinely good. This helps us keep all of the content on the site free of charge. As Monty Python once said, “We’re selling records in the foyer. Some of us have gotta eat too you know”.

Behind Bape

Examing the early roots of Nigo, A Bathing Ape, Last Orgy and beyond

A Bathing Ape, or BAPE, is one of the world’s most popular brands, specializing in streetwear and lifestyle clothing. BAPE’s founder Nigo is almost as famous as his brand, having collaborated with everyone from musicians  such as Pharrell Williams and Kanye West, to brands like Pepsi, Stüssy, and Adidas. Japanoscope has translated a 1997 interview with Nigo here

BAPE has inspired collectors around the world to purchase anything associated with the brand, with some of the collectors becoming popular on Instagram, and even getting interviewed about the extent of their collections.

What Does Bape stand for?

Bape is short for “A Bathing Ape In Lukewarm Water”. The initial concept came from Japanese illustrator and designer Skate Thing who got the idea after seeing an illustration of a monkey in a hot spring (itself an image famously associated with Japan). 

The other inspiration behind the name comes from the Planet of the Apes film, which features a society that has fallen down due to excess and hedonism. Nigo was a big fan of pop culture, including Planet of the Apes. In BAPE immagery, the ape can be seen as a symbol of human kind in its most “primitive form”. So the image of the monkey-man, sitting in Luke warm water, as if he had been lazing around in a luxurious bath so long that the water was starting to go cold, was an ironic dig at the consumer culture of the Bubble-era Japanese youth generation that Nigo was born into. 

 

Before starting the BAPE clothing line in 1993, Nigo was known as Tomoaki Nagao and he looked up to the Japanese musician and fashion icon Hiroshi Fujiwara, especially Fujiwara’s Last Orgy series. So what was Last Orgy?

 

Last Orgy 1

In 1986 Japanese musicians Hiroshi Fujiwara and Takagi Kan released their first music as Tiny Panx on the album 建設的(Construction), which was released as a joint album with Seiko Ito. The Tiny Panx name, which changed from Tiny Panx Organization, T.P.O., Tinnie Punx, Tiny Panx, Tiny Punx, and TPO depending on the release, was inspired by Fujiwara’s nickname given to him while he had spent time in London during the 1980’s. 

Inspired by his time in London and New York during the 80’s, Fujiwara had returned to Japan influenced by the exploding hip hop scene, and Tiny Panx became one of the earliest Japanese hip hop groups, who would support the Beastie Boys on their Japan tour in 1987.

In 1988 Tiny Panx released the song Last Orgy on the influential Japanese record label Major Force. This was Major Force’s debut release, and the label would go on to release music by Toshio Nakanishi aka Tycoon Tosh from Plastics and Melon, DJ Red Alert of The Wild Bunch, and the Japanese hip hop group Scha Dara Parr.

Last Orgy contains a mixture of English and Japanese lyrics, with the Japanese delivered in an English accent at times, making the lyrics almost hard to decipher.

 

 

Peter and Fumiko from Japanoscope listened through to the track and did their best to transcribe the words, and the below is their best approximation. XXXs represent bits they couldn’t take a good guess at. If anyone has a better idea of what this says, please let us know!

How to make / Loving is student
Now I’m telling you / Geisha Boys
You moving / まずはそこから
Feel the beat yo / ラップに決ら
Little punx / Listen while I say
All the bullshit / Try to walk this way
Got to keep xxxx / You don’t stop
その気になるまでやらなきゃど
Rhymingしなけりゃ始まらない
575resumeはget no fight / DJの作り出すリズムをget XXX / すかさずマイクでXXX
Deepになりたきゃ今Rock hard
Major Corporation Boyそうしたら
Xxx / 俺はMCカン
酔い出しゃ止まらぬBoogie Wonderland
Last Orgy / Just tonight
マイクのチエック123 / Check it on the needle
それどうり / Ready now
ひろしはいつでもTry to get busy
Tiny Punks / The place to be
黙っていれずに

Gonna Rock Baby Ready for rock yeah
用意は出来てる

Motherfucking Sucker / Kick it Strip it rest / ビートで dig it Xxx in the house / In the Tokyo posse Xxx / Xxx / Kicking the line? Tycoon Toshi gonna make you fine / まつだせいこ and Double Master X They’re in the Xxx one more sex

Last orgy / Last orgy just tonight

Last orgy / Last orgy just tonight

Kan’s rhymeは やくざ Machine gun おまけに中身はAin’t no冗談 目の前そのまま現実Hard core Watch out / いつでも体をCheck you? Xxx よりの近未来 チェルノブイリに Green Mile Straight to hell / ごめんだ wake up Punkもserious / Never see the future? Xxx / Keep the party / Never negative xxx on the mic / Like this Beep  Jump up / Movin’ and groovin’ and chillin’ and illin’ and xxx Xxx / Kan China Say yeah

In 1987 Fujiwara and Kan were invited to start a column in the Japanese magazine Takarajima, and they called the column Last Orgy, with the column making its debut in Takarajima’s July 1987 issue. Through the column they wrote about, promoted and recommended music, clothing, and film, focusing on what would become known as Street Culture. The monthly column became influential and spun off into a TV series airing on FM-TV in Japan, which featured the same content but this time in video. 

The July 1987 issue looked like this: 

Here’s Kan and Hiroshi scratching it up on the Last Orgy TV show.

One of their fans was a young Tomoaki Nagao who would record each episode of Last Orgy and re-watch them with his friends on repeat. Last Orgy influenced Nagao’s decision to move to Tokyo and enroll at the fashion institute 文化服装学院 (Bunka Fashion College) where he met the aspiring designer Jun “Jonio” Takahashi.

Tomoaki Nagao soon earned himself the nickname Fujiwara Hiroshi Nigo, Fujiwara Hiroshi Number Two, due to Nagao’s likeness to Fujiwara. Nagao embraced the nickname and he soon after met Fujiwara who hired Nigo as his personal assistant, with the two becoming friends. In 1993 when Nigo and Jonio decided to open their own store it was with the support of Fujiwara, and their Nowhere store became an important part of Japanese street culture history.

Last Orgy 2

While working as an assistant to Fujiwara, Nigo also began a part-time job at the Japanese culture magazine Popeye where he contributed a new column titled Last Orgy 2. This new column was written by Nigo and Jonio and served as a continuation of the Last Orgy by Fujiwara and Kan which had ended around 1990.

 

In 1991 Nigo and Jonio collaborated on the Last Orgy 2 t-shirts, which continued to be released into 1994. These featured assorted designs, from photography, to text, and were released through their Nowhere store, with the back of one t-shirt detailing the Last Orgy history and announcing that as of June 1994 the Last Orgy 2 column was finished but would be relaunching soon as Last Orgy 3.

 

For Christmas 1994 a Last Orgy 2 Stadium Jacket was released, and this design was later re-released in 2009 alongside several t-shirts, as part of a promotion for a new Nowhere store opening in Hong Kong. 

 

Last Orgy 3

In September 1994, Nigo and Jonio collaborated with Fujiwara on a new column titled Last Orgy III, which was now in the culture magazine Asayan. By now Nigo had his BAPE line, Jonio was running his Undercover brand, Fujiwara had his Good Enough clothing line, and the Last Orgy III column tended to focus on these brands, serving as a promotional advertisement for Nigo, Jonio, and Fujiwara’s brands, as well as promoting their Nowhere store.

You can see some Last Orgy articles in English translation here.

 

In 1995 there were still new Last Orgy 2 t-shirts produced, as well as a new Last Orgy song.

 

Record on Amazon

In the 1990’s James Lavelle had started the Mo’ Wax record label in England and collaborated with the Japanese label Major Force, eventually re-releasing most of their catalogue to a wider audience. Through his friendship with Major Force, Lavelle soon met Nigo and the pair became friends, with Lavelle soon inviting Nigo to record in the Mo’ Wax studios in London. This collaboration would eventuate in Nigo’s debut album Ape Sounds, a mix of hip hop and rock similar to Lavelle’s own UNKLE project. Nigo also collaborated with Lavelle on the Planet of The Apes inspired song Ape Shall Never Kill Ape, which featured members of Major Force, UNKLE, Nigo, and UK turntablists The Scratch Perverts all on one song.

During this period Lavelle also released a song called Last Orgy 3, which featured Takagi Kan rapping much like on the original Tiny Panx song which had released almost ten years previously in 1988. Last Orgy 3 first appeared in 1997 on a mix CD by Nigo and James Lavelle titled A Bathing Ape Vs Mo’Wax, and was later released on CD and Vinyl with several remixes in 1998.

Last Orgy 4…and beyond.

The final Last Orgy so far, Last Orgy Four was a t-shirt collection released around 2000, and is the only Last Orgy to have been released without an associated magazine column, tv series, or song sharing its title. Around this time Nigo and Jonio were contributing a column titled 4lom to Smart magazine, which was similar to Last Orgy and had begun in 1996 and continued in to the 2000’s, while Nigo also contributed his General’s Seminar columns to Relax magazine for several years in the early 2000’s.

 

IAlongside the 2009 re-release of the Last Orgy jacket was a Last Orgy shoe which released in 2010. The shoes were a collaboration with Nigo’s BAPE company and featured their Bapesta shoe design. Since then there has been little news of further Last Orgy lines, but the brands close ties to BAPE may be one of the reasons for the draught, as in 2013 Nigo left BAPE and is now working with the Japanese brand Uniqlo.

There are even Bape masks made for those that want to maintain style during pandemics. 

But what of the original Last Orgy creators, Hiroshi Fujiwara and Takagi Kan? Both of the original Tiny Panx have continued to work in their respective fields, with Fujiwara regarded as an important part of the Japanese fashion world, with his career recounted in two large English language books from publisher Rizzoli.

Meanwhile Kan continues to release music with Major Force, and in 2020 he has been putting on live performances via his Instagram page while the world has been locked down during the Corona Virus pandemic.

Further Reading:

Ametora: How Japan Saved American Style by Marx, W. David 
Hiroshi Fujiwara: Fragment by Sarah Lerfel and Ino Hidefum

Why is Bape so expensive?

Even though Bape makes street ware, the idea of “luxury” is part of its core. From the start, its branding was based around an ironic take on “A Bathing Ape in a Luke Warm Hot Spring”, meaning a primitive person soaking up the luxury. So its no suprise that Bape pricing reflects this focus on the hedonistic urge. 

This fits in with the larger trend within hip hop and street cultures to fetichize wealth in the form of gold chains, diamonds and brands. 

In a way, it is odd that this question is asked about Bape more than any other brand at the high end of the market such as, say, Apple. The cost of anything is rarely based on just the cost of what an item cost to produce.

Contributor

James Gaunt is an artist, writer and musician based in Tokyo.

Traditional Japanese Pajamas Gallery & Guide

Japanese Pjs Gallery

寝間着

We spend approximately one third of our lives sleeping. Why not do it in style? Who says you have to look a grandparent when you get into bed? 

 

Japan has a lot of luxurious and exotic options for things things to wear between the sheets. A few options include silky kimono robes, more practical & understated Jinbei (which we’ve done a whole post about here) or a Yukata summer kimono, which would look equally at home at a festival in Japan. Let’s have a look at what’s out there.

A typical Jinbei

What is a Kimono?

First thing’s first, what does this word “Kimono”, which we all use, mean?Literally, “Kimono” really just means “clothing”. The two characters that make up the word are: 

着 “Ki” which means to wear

物 “mono” meaning thing.

So any “thing” you “wear” is a kimono. As Western culture was imported into Japan in the late 19th century, there began to be a distinction between kimono and “western” clothing, referred to as Yofuku 洋服  

Today Kimono is used in Japan to refer to any clothing that is traditional. So within “Kimono” you have a range of styles. Let’s look at a few which can be used as Japanese pyjamas.

Japanese Kimono Silk Robes vs. Jinbei vs. robe style Yukata

Yukata ー The simplest form of Kimono. The Yukata is a robe that was traditionally worn before and after bathing. Over time, it has become a Kimono that is often worn at festivals in the summer months. Other kimono have a reputation for being difficult to put on correctly without practice. The Yukata, by contrast, is Kimono for the masses. They are also traditionally worn without any long undergarments.

They are traditionally made of cotton or sythetic materials.

Jinbei – are a bit closer to Western style clothing than a full blown robe-style Yukata. So they are a little bit less of an overt “statement”. They are also easier to slip on and off because you don’t have to worry about tying up your obi belt. A lesser known are a subset of Kimono, they are light cotton or hemp material top and bottom pairs that are made to be airy by including hatched gaps along the stitching.

 

Gustav_Klimt_-_Dame_mit_Fächer

Silk or satern kimono style robes and Haori

 There is a long history of women wearing Kimonos as Japanese night-ware stretching back to the Japonism movement in Europe. These long flowing robes, often made of silk or satern, have come to represent luxuriousness and exoticism. Today you see a lot of variations including shorter garments somewhere between a Haori (jacket or overcoat) and a full length Kimono.

Are Kimono worn by both men and women?

Cotton vs. Hemp

Since Kimono simply means clothing, yes, men and women did and do wear Kimono. There are plenty of sleepwear & Japanese pajama options for men & women.

Materials for Jinbei and yukata are roughly divided into cotton and hemp (linen), either of which may be 100% or mixed. The more cotton you have, the better it feels and the easier it is to clean.  Hemp tends to wrinkle more than cotton, but will give you a breezier feel.

Some garments also use Japanese paper, “washi”, as a mixing material – especially in some of the more high end examples.

The more luxurious robes use materials such as silk or satin.

Stand Out Japanese Pjs from other online stores

Recommended Men's Japanese Pajamas

Cotton & Japanese paper made Jinbei from Ikisugata on Amazon

  • High-end, muted-tone Jinbei with 55% cotton and 45% Japanese Washi paper material!
  • Aerated seams
  • Pocket
  • Made In Japan
Dark Cotton Watanosato Jinbei on Amazaon

 

  • Cotton
  • Double stitched
  • pockets on front, pant side and back
  • Made in japan
  • Rich color
Jinbei M-LL image 0
Traditional Striped Jinbei on Etsy
  • Cotton
  • 2 piece
  • pocket
  • handmade
Watanosato Hemp Blend jinbei on Amazon

  • Made In Japan
  • Cotton 85% hemp15%
  • Aerated seams
  • Multiple pockets
  • Traditional navy
Ikisugata Jinbei Rich Black on Amazon

  • High end item
  • Cotton:55%, Japanese paper:45%
  • Made in Japan
  • Rich shijira black

  • Linen material
  • Comes with bonus Kinchaku-bukuro bag 
  • Made in Japan
  • In cool muted tones
Trad-style Jinbei on AliExpress
  • Cost effective
  • 100% cotton
  • Aerated seems
Patterned Pajama Style Jinbei on AliExpress
  • Unisex design
  • Cotton
  • Cost effective
  • vibrant colored pattern

Recommended women's Pajamas

Summer white & red jinbei on Etsy
Peony Floral pattern Women’s Jinbei on CDJapan
Women’s cute cat print Jinbei on AliExpress
Muted tone, large dotted jinbei on AliExpress
Women’s Pink floral Surugajino Samue on Amazon

Tokyoin breathable Matte Cotton on Amazon

Tokyoin Pink Breathable Matte Cotton on Amazon

Simple red & white Stripe Women’s Jinbei on AliExpress
Kawaii floral cotton Jinbei on AliExpress

Recommended Japanse children's Pajamas

Hot Biscuits Boats & Bears boys Jinbei on Amazon

Hot Biscuits butterflies and bunnies Jinbei on Amazon

Kid’s colored spots jinbei on Etsy
Japanese Kimono Jinbei Children/Imperial Kamon CREST/Japanese image 0
Imperial crest pattern Jinbei on Etsy

Look for more Jinbei options on Amazon

Look for more Jinbei options on Etsy

Japanoscope is a registered affiliate with several online shops and may receive a commission when you click on some of the links within content.

Contributor

Hi, I’m Peter.  I lived in Japan for four years as a University student completing a Masters Degree in Musicology.  I have succesfully completed the  highest level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (N1).  have toured the country six times playing music and singing songs in Japanese and English.

All about Jinbei clothing (or Jimbei, Jimbe, or Jinbe if you prefer)

Get your Jinbei on

甚平

I love my Jinbei. In summer you can’t get me out of the thing. They are just so light and airy, with their open hatched seems and light cotton/hemp fabric.

Jinbei 1
A typical Jinbei

There is a long history of women wearing Kimonos as Japanese nightwear stretching back to the Japonism movement in Europe. Here’s a Klimt painting of a European woman in a kimono.

Gustav_Klimt_-_Dame_mit_Fächer
Klimpt painting of woman in Kimono

Jinbei are light cotton or hemp material top and bottom pairs that are made to be airy by including hatched gaps along the stitching. The great thing about Jinbei is that they pass both as pajamas and as casual wear that can be worn outside the house. In Japan, you sometimes see people wearing these at festivals, or around hot springs. A common pattern goes: relax in hot-bath, put Jinbei on for the evening, then wear them straight to bed.These garments are designed to be super cool for hot summer nights, loose fitting and comfy.

Are Jenbei worn by both men and women?

Cotton vs. Hemp

Traditionally Jinbei have tended to be worn mostly by men and children. Recently there are a lot of designs that have been made for women also, but the more robe-like Yukata (of which Jinbei are considered to be a sub genre of) are more common. 

Many of the Jinbei are “unisex”. Indeed the only real difference between these Jinbei is the coloring and visual patterns.

Jinbei materials are roughly divided into cotton and hemp (linen), either of which may be 100% or mixed. The more cotton you have, the better it feels and the easier it is to clean.  Hemp tends to wrinkle more than cotton, but will give you a breezier feel.

Some jinbei also use Japanese paper, “washi”, as a mixing material – especially in some of the more high end examples.

When to wear Jinbei?

  • In hot weather
  • In bed as pajamas
  • Going out to a festival
  • Before and after a bath

What to wear with Jinbei?

Generally people wear open footwear with Jinbei in the form of Geta. Sandals will do the job just as well.

File:Geta.JPG - Wikimedia Commons

Jinbei vs. robe style Yukata

Jinbei are a bit closer to Western style clothing than a full blown robe-style Yukata. So they are a little bit less of an overt “statement”. They are also easier to slip on and off because you don’t have to worry about tying up your obi belt.

People often accessorize with tradional, such as a kinchakubukuro bag.

File:Kinchaku Sack.jpg - Wikipedia

Now you’ve got all the info you need to embark on your quest for the perfect Jimbei. We’ve searched across the internet to find a selection across a range of outlets:

Recommended women's Jinbei

#1 Seigaha Jinbei

Women's Jinbei

Seigaha Ocean Wave Pattern Women’s Jinbei on Foxtume

Pros

  • Quality materials and craftsmanship
  • Distinctive Seigaha Pattern, at once classic and modern
  • Soft, breathable cotton
  • Aerated seams
Update: Use Discount Code “japanoscope” for  15% discount from Foxtume

#2 Muted Tone Jinbei

Muted tone, large dotted jinbei on AliExpress
 Pros
  • Muted Tone with subtle, sparse polka dots
  • Elastic waste shorts suitable for using as sleepwear
  • Very reasonably priced

Cons

  • No aerated seams 

#3 Cat Print Jinbei

Women’s cute cat print Jinbei on AliExpress

Pros

  • Range of Cute Designs
  • Relatively long pants
  • Front Pocket

Cons

  • No aerated seams

#4 Traditional Dark Jinbei

Black floral Jinbei on Etsy

Pros

  • Distinctive dark design
  • Traditional design

Cons

  • No aerated seams

#5 Traditional Light Floral Jinbei

Summer white & red jinbei on Etsy

Pros

  • Bright, floral design
  • Traditional design
  • Front Pocket

Cons

  • No aerated seams

#6 Unique High Contrast Jinbei

Peony Floral pattern Women’s Jinbei on CDJapan

Pros

  • Highly unique contrasting black & floral design
  • More vivid colored pattern than more traditional designs
  • Peony & Sakura

Cons

  • 70% cotton, 30% polyester

#7 Kawaii Pink Jinbei

Women’s Pink floral Surugajino Samue on Amazon

Pros

  • Kawaii design
  • 100% cotton
  • Pocket

Cons

  • No aerated seams

#8 Kawaii Red & White Jinbei

Women’s floral Jinbei Surugajino Samueya on Amazon

Pros

  • Kawaii design
  • 100% cotton
  • Pocket

Cons

  • No aerated seams

#9 Black Floral Jinbei

Tokyoin breathable Matte Cotton on Amazon

Pros

  • Kawaii design
  • 100% cotton
  • Drawstring Elastic Waste
  • Pocket

Cons

  • No aerated seams

#10 Pink Floral Jinbei

Tokyoin Pink Breathable Matte Cotton on Amazon

Pros

  • Kawaii design
  • 100% cotton
  • Drawstring Elastic Waste
  • Pocket

Cons

  • No aerated seams

#11 Simple Striped Jinbei

 

Simple red & white Stripe Women’s Jinbei on AliExpress

Pros

  • Simple striped design
  • 100% cotton
  • Aerated seams

Cons

  • No pockets

Recommended Men's Jinbei

#1 Foxtume Seigaha Jinbei

High quality cotton, all purpose Jinbei appropriate for outside use, bath wear or sleep wear.

Pros

  • High quality materials and construction
  • Classic traditional Japanese pattern
  • Fully aerated seams
  • drawstring
  • elastic waste

Cons

  • Patterning may be too “Loud” for some

Use Discount Code “japanoscope” for  15% discount from Foxtume

#2 Newchic Seigaha Jinbei

A light Jinbei appropriate for outside use, bath wear or sleep wear.

Pros

  • Simple, reasonably priced jinbei
  • Classic traditional Japanese pattern
  • drawstring
  • elastic waste

Cons

  • No aerated seems

#3 Foxtume Dragon Jinbei

High quality, striking Dragon themed blue cotton Jinbei.

Pr0

  • Striking design
  • Quality materials
  • Aerated seams
  • drawstring

Cons

  • Dragon theme too overtly masculine for some
  • Use Discount Code “japanoscope” for  15% discount from Foxtume

#4 Ikisugata Jinbei With Washi Paper

Cotton & Japanese paper made Jinbei from Ikisugata on Amazon

Pros

  • High-end, muted-tone Jinbei with 55% cotton and 45% Japanese Washi paper material!
  • Aerated seams
  • Pocket
  • Made In Japan
  • Cons
  • Relatively expensive

#5 Linen Jinbei

  • Linen material
  • Comes with bonus Kinchaku-bukuro bag 
  • Made in Japan
  • In cool muted tones

#6 Hemp Blend Jinbei

Watanosato Hemp Blend jinbei on Amazon

  • Made In Japan
  • Cotton 85% hemp15%
  • Aerated seams
  • Multiple pockets
  • Traditional navy

#7 Dark Minimal Jinbei

Trad-style Jinbei on AliExpress
  • Cost effective
  • 100% cotton
  • Aerated seems

#8 Calligraphy Jinbei

Calligraphy Jinbei on Aliexpress
  • Calligraphy meaning : 本気でやれば、何でもできる “Do your all and anything is possible”
  • Aerated seems
  • Reasonable Price
  • Pocket

#9 Black Ikisugata Jinbei

Ikisugata Jinbei Rich Black on Amazon

  • High end item
  • Cotton:55%, Japanese paper:45%
  • Made in Japan
  • Rich shijira black

#11 Dark Watanosato Jinbei

Dark Cotton Watanosato Jinbei on Amazaon

 

  • Cotton
  • Double stitched
  • pockets on front, pant side and back
  • Made in japan
  • Rich color

#10Traditional Striped Jinbei

Jinbei M-LL image 0
Traditional Striped Jinbei on Etsy
  • Cotton
  • 2 piece
  • pocket
  • handmade

Recommended children's Jinbei

Hot Biscuits Boats & Bears boys Jinbei on Amazon

Hot Biscuits butterflies and bunnies Jinbei on Amazon

Kid’s colored spots jinbei on Etsy
Japanese Kimono Jinbei Children/Imperial Kamon CREST/Japanese image 0
Imperial crest pattern Jinbei on Etsy

Overall, for women the Seigaha Ocean Wave Pattern Women’s Jinbei on Foxtume and for men the Foxtume Seigaha came out as our clear favorite.

If you’re looking for something a bit warmer, take a look at our Hanten page.

 We’ve also got a page on male kimonos here.

Japanoscope is a registered affiliate with several online shops and may receive a commission when you click on some of the links within content.

Look for more Jinbei options on Amazon

Look for more Jinbei options on Etsy